Room 1

Room 2

Room 3

Room 4

Room 5

 

09:00

Plenary session

9:30

 Unbelievable! Figuring out how others think

Robert van Lieshout

Max: 16 
 A retrospective's anti-patterns retrospective

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse
&
Philippe Vandessel

 Heroic Fantasy BDD Scaffolding at the Gilded Rose Inn

Philippe Bourgau
&
Ahmad Atwi

 Teams hiring their manager. An experience report from Deutsche Bahn Systel.

Christophe Vantighem

Max: 60 
 Being Agile is not enough, be responsible!

Sylvain CHERY

Max: 20 
 

10:30

Coffee break

11:00

 Team up with growing your own mind set

Edwin Hanegraaf

 Fix your Scrum with flow metrics!

Mohamed Gargouri
&
Samuel Leroy

Computer
Max: 30 
 Obfuscating Code

Vera Peeters

Computer
Max: 30 
 Participatory budgetting and Lean Portfolio Management

Chris Verlnden

Computer
Max: 40 
 Thought experiment combining Agile and compliance

Patrick Duisters
&
Marco van de Pol

Max: 30 
 

12:30

lunch

13:30

Plenary session

14:30

 Engagement Scan

Karen De Boeck
&
Jurgen Maus

Max: 24 
 Agility in the building sector – is that possible?

Satu Panzner
&
Philipp.Diebold@bagilstein.de

Max: 24 
 Debriefing! This is the way

Cédric Pontet

Max: 30 
 Let the drawing beast out!

Dimitri Bauwens

Max: 50 
 What's on your team's mind?

Eddy Bruin

Max: 20 
 

15:30

Coffee break

16:00

 The Great Sense of belonging

jord@humanfarer.com

Max: 20 

Moving motivators, MeWe cards personality types, Community canvas
Agility in the building sector – is that possible?

CONTINUED

 Xtrem TDD

Yoan Thirion
&
Guillaume Faas

Computer
Max: 30 
 Death to boring meetings

Jeremy Nathaniel Akers

Max: 200 
 Spiral into Teamwork

Remi-Armand Collaris

Max: 18 

Download materials for a constellation using Spiral Dynamics (comming soon)
 

17:30

 Fishbowl discussion about all things agile

Yves Hanoulle

Closing Plenary

18:00

Drinks at the bar, sponsored by…

19:00

Dinner

21:00

Evening programme

21:00

 Let's build a mandala

Cédric Pontet

Max: 15 
         
Legend
Technology and Technique
Customer and Planning
Intro's and Cases
Team and Individual
Process and Improvement
Other

Session descriptions

A retrospective's anti-patterns retrospective

A facilitated retrospective about anti-patterns in retrospectives

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse
& Philippe Vandessel

Retrospectives are pretty standard in agile teams, perhaps so typical that the regular retrospectives are not yielding the value expected and the goals of retrospectives initially presumed. What's happening with retrospectives? What are common anti-patterns?

Join our session to inspect your retrospectives, specifically to share and learn about anti-patterns. As a beginner, you can learn from the group. As a more experienced agilist, you can share your experiences and what you have done in the past. Having experience with retrospectives, either as a participant or facilitator, is highly preferable.

Goal of the session: To learn and share about common anti-patterns in retrospectives and how to deal with these.
Intended audience: Ellen, Hank, Bram, Leo, Jan, Marieke
Expected experience: Active experience with retrospectives, either as a participant or as a facilitator.
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning session

Are retrospectives vehicles for continuous improvement? Do you get the value out of retrospectives? We will facilitate a retrospective about retrospectives. Many teams are doing retrospectives. How productive are these? The session aims to discuss anti-patterns and understand how to prevent and deal with these. It's more than a couple of techniques or formats to facilitate or entertain a retrospective. Let's get to the essence of what retrospectives are about.

An example anti-pattern is the "Whack-a-mole" pattern, in which a team discusses and tries to improve everything that's happening in a sprint, resulting in little or no improvements in the end. The improvement issues keep on popping up, and the more you try to improve little things, the more minor problems appear, without any structural improvements made in the end.

You participate by sharing your experiences, deep-dive in causes and exploring possible experiments to improve. We will guide the session, give examples of anti-patterns and add our insights. The primary purpose is to create a space where you can learn from your peers.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


Heroic Fantasy BDD Scaffolding at the Gilded Rose Inn

Using Example Mapping and BDD to reverse engineer the specs, and eventually test Legacy Code

Philippe Bourgau
& Ahmad Atwi

I guess you've never seen a Goblin, an Elf, and a Dwarf at XP Days!

They have agreed to leave the Gilded Rose for the length of this session. Like many of us, they face the challenge of legacy code with forgotten specs. Through an arcane ritual, they will show us how they use Example Mapping and Cucumber test automation to get Legacy Code under control by building a test harness around the Gilded Rose codebase.

Attend the very first play of future comedy stars! 🤥🤥🤥

Goal of the session: Learn how to apply Example Mapping to retro-engineer the specs of legacy code, and have fun!
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Leo, Bram, Philippe, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Session Type: 60 min discovery session

I guess you've never seen a Goblin, an Elf, and a Dwarf at XP Days!

They have agreed to leave the Gilded Rose for the length of this session. Like many of us, they face the challenge of legacy code with forgotten specs. A wizard taught them a ritual to bring their fragment of memories together and write functional non-regression tests around their legacy code.

During the session, they will walk us through how they use Example Mapping and Cucumber test automation to get Legacy Code under control by building a test harness around the Gilded Rose codebase. On top of that, this ritual:

– Only needs a phone call to get former experts to contribute

– Will let you acquire key allies in the organization

– Will lead to both specs and tests

– Will confront thought-of-specs with actual behavior

– Will let you discover unknown conflicting features causing a lot of bugs

– Is compatible with both rewrite or refactor

Attend the very first play of future comedy stars! 🤥🤥🤥

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
60

Teams hiring their manager. An experience report from Deutsche Bahn Systel.

How to create a network of self-organized teams which are choosing their leaders.

Christophe Vantighem

Do you think that an organization where teams hire their manager is still an utopy?

At DB Systel, the internal IT service provider of Deutsche Bahn, it is now a reality. Five years ago, our CEO invited 200 managers of the company to present the transformation. Each manager had to apply either for a role of product owner or agility master in the new organization. And to be accepted in the new structure, they had to be certified and be selected by their teams.

I will present what we have learned from our agile transformation and give concrete examples as a coach and as member of the new organization.

Goal of the session: Pick concrete learnings for the agile transformation and get inspired about the future of management in agile organizations.
Intended audience: Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Ellen
Expected experience: no
Session Type: 60 min short experience report (30 min)

Do you think that an organization where teams hire their manager is still an utopy? If we trust that the best decisions come from people facing the customers, then it is a logical consequence.

At DB Systel, the internal IT service provider of Deutsche Bahn, it is now a reality. Five years ago, our CEO invited 200 managers of the company to present the transformation. Each manager had to apply either for a role of product owner or agility master in the new organization. And to be accepted in the new structure, they had to be certified and be selected by their teams.

I will present what we have learned from our agile transformation and give concrete examples as a coach and as member of the new organization.

I hope that everyone can pick up concrete learnings for their transformation and get inspired about the future of management in agile organizations.

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
20

Being Agile is not enough, be responsible!

Let's explore how Agile can contribute to a more sustainable IT

Sylvain CHERY

Do you feel sometimes that your team, your client, have a limited understanding of the impacts of the digital product/service that they are developing together? Are they naive, cynical, indifferent or just unaware of the potential social and environmental impacts of IT?

The truth is that we must reconsider the way we design, build and use digital services to be more sustainable, more respectful of the environment and more ethical to society. Are you ready to join the movement?

Goal of the session: You will learn collaboratively the basics of Sustainable IT, what it is, why it is important now & for the future, and how YOU, as agile practitioner, can join the movement.
Intended audience: Leo, Bram, Vincent, Joke, Hank and Ellen
Expected experience: You don't need to have prior knowledge of sustainable / green IT to join this session, however you are expected to have at least a basic knowledge and a first experience of Agile software product development.
Session Type: 60 min discovery session

In this workshop we will explore together the diverse dimensions of Sustainable IT (Green IT, IT for Green, Human IT, IT for Human) to better understand the challenges created by digital technology and the areas of action to prevent/reduce its negative impacts and increase the positive ones.

We will discuss why and how the Agile mindset empowers people to design and build more responsible digital services.

We will also try to identify how Agile practitioners should still adapt their views, posture, practices, tools… to align more with sustainable IT goals.

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
16

Unbelievable! Figuring out how others think

A game to explore your team's hidden beliefs and assumptions

Robert van Lieshout

Why did my team mate get upset? Was it something I said?

In this experimental card game you will explore each other's hidden beliefs and assumptions. In doing so, you'll gain a better understanding of each other – and of yourself!

Goal of the session: Participants will learn a way to explore hidden beliefs and assumptions that they and other team members hold.
Intended audience: Joke, Ellen, Marieke, Leo, Bram
Expected experience: Experience of talking to other people (and maybe some listening)
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning session

Why did my team mate get upset? Was it something I said?

We are all unique and diverse individuals, yet increasingly we need to work together in teams.

The great thing about all this diversity is that we can see things from different perspectives.

But sometimes the diversity also means we have a hard time understanding each other.

In this experimental card game you will explore each other's hidden beliefs and assumptions. In doing so, you'll gain a better understanding of each other – and of yourself!

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


Team up with growing your own mind set

The power of curiosity, listening and presence…

Edwin Hanegraaf

Often people say that coaching is primarily the art of asking "powerful questions". The concept of what coaching is, is quite often misunderstood, because coaching is much more that just asking "powerful questions" and requires much more from a coach to help your coachees gain value from it. And the learnings from professional coaching can be applied in a much broader way than just in one-to-one-coachings. Curious about how? Join this session to find out…

Goal of the session: Learn to use professional coaching competencies in your daily job
Intended audience: Jan, Leo, Bram, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning session

In this interactive session, we will explore the power of the professional coaching competencies (according to the ICF-PCC coaching standards) to get in touch with yourself. If you understand the impact of the communication you bring in by yourself, it can support you in understanding different impacts that you can make. This does not only apply to agile coaching in which professional coaching is one of the stances you can take. Professional coaching includes many microstances that can be used to enrich everybody lives, starting with your own and next those of others around you.

This interactive workshop is intended for anyone involved, because we are all humans and therefore all communicate. This is a hands-on session, where several situations from our daily business will be roleplayed and you can find out your own response to it. And demonstrated as an alternative how other viewpoints could help you in responding differently or more impactful.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
30

Laptop

Fix your Scrum with flow metrics!

Mohamed Gargouri
& Samuel Leroy

Goal of the session: Experience the benefits of flow within the Sprint.
Intended audience: anyone practicing Scrum
Expected experience: all levels
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning session

Considering a successful Sprint is the one that achieve a Sprint Goal that bring value to your users.

Attending our session will help you understand how flow metrics will increase the chances to achieve your Sprint Goals.

Are you usually finishing the Sprint with items still in-progress?

Are you struggling in getting stakeholders feedback during the Sprint?

You will be doing interactive simulations to experience the flow metrics benefits.

Simulations debrief will help you engage in discussions and get a deeper understanding.

Simulations will be done via an online tool requiring a laptop with internet access. We will be providing 10 laptops. You will be working in groups of 3.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
30

Laptop

Obfuscating Code

If it stinks, change it. —Grandma Beck, discussing child-rearing philosophy.

Vera Peeters

Clean code is code that does not smell.

Smelly code is code that is not clean.

We will learn more about clean code by crafting really smelly code.

Goal of the session: learn about clean code and simple atomic refactoring techniques
Intended audience: jan bram philippe hank
Expected experience: some notions of a programming language and unit tests
Session Type: 90 min hands on coding/design/architecture session

We start from small fully tested coding examples and a list of obfuscating-steps.

An obfuscating-step is an atomic operation that you can perform on code to make it more smelly.

The code will become really bad, but all tests have to remain green.

Obfuscating code is an interesting and amusing way to explore the difference between clean and smelly code.

A fun exercise for anyone who loves writing code and who enjoys reflecting on code quality.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Back to program


max
40

Laptop

Participatory budgetting and Lean Portfolio Management

Use the wisdom of the crowd to decide where the money goes.

Chris Verlnden

Experience how you can use the wisdom of the crowd to prioritize your portfolio of initiatives and features and decide on the funding needed.

Each participant at the table receives an equal part of the total budget and can decide to fund a feature, alone or in collaboration with others. The result from the different tables are pooled and at the end it will become clear which initiatives stakeholders want to fund entirely, partially, or not at all.

Goal of the session: Participants will experience a lean and agile alternative to traditional budgeting, where many people work together to decide how money available is best spent.
Intended audience: Georges, Vincent, Joke, Ellen
Expected experience: No particular experience, some business maturity
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning session

Let us face it: traditional finance and budgeting processes are not exactly best mates with lean and agile. Budget control is part of Command and Control: make sure that no money is spent without approval up front. But companies start to realize that the yearly budget cycle introduces a long waiting time and is deadly for your time to market.

In this workshop, you will experience how collaborative, participatory budgeting can engage many stakeholders, capture the vision and priorities of a large group and translate them into actionable budgets.

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
30

Thought experiment combining Agile and compliance

Patrick Duisters
& Marco van de Pol

In an interactive workshop, we want to learn from you as the agile community on how you think we can deal with the challenges of applying agile practices in regulated environments. Of course we have our ideas and we are curious about your vision on our solution.

Goal of the session: The aim of this session is to create insight about the combination of Agile and working in a regulated environment where compliancy is key. They seem to be 2 opposites of which integration of both is hardly possible. We believe it is possible. We even believe it is also possible in other regulated industries like medical. We want to share and evaluate our vision and together come to a generic set of good practices for applying agile in a(ny) regulated environment.Key take aways: pro and cons, arguments how to deal with compliance in an agile environment.
Intended audience: everyone working in an environment where regulations are applicable.
Expected experience: not necessary but some experience can be usefull.
Session Type: 90 min discovery session

In an interactive workshop we would like to discover how people in the Agile community think about the combination of Agile and Compliancy. How do you build up a burden of proof in an Agile environment that complies with the applicable laws and regulations? In the current situation, we see that the collection of evidence is often done at the end of the process. The collection itself is a time-consuming event, assuming that the evidence is traceable, consistent and complete. However, this is seldom the case.

At Improve Quality Services together with ICT Group, we have tried to tackle this topic. We started off with a specific industry: Automotive, where Automotive-SPICE, or A-SPICE is a common standard. It stands for Automotive Software Process Improvement and Capability Determination. It was created to assess the performance of OEM supplier development processes in the automotive industry. It defines base practices and work products to ensure the highest quality of (embedded) automotive software development. The asseessment process is based on audits carried out by external, independent A-SPICE-certified assessors. The collection of evidence and records is essential for obtaining and maintaining the certification and maturity level.

The process, is V-model oriented and the evidence is often collected at the end of development. Agile working is rare in this industry. From own experiences and discussions with agile and automotive experts it became clear to us that people are quite open to an Agile way of working but there is a greater need for tools to support and simplify the process.

So, our vision is not focusing on convincing them to start working agile, but set up a tool chain that supports and simplifies a complaint process, AND seamlessly integrates Automotive SPICE with modern and flexible development practices such as Agile and Behaviour Driven Development.

Our goal for this session is to share and evaluate our vision and together come to a generic set of good practices for applying agile in a(ny) regulated environment.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
24

Engagement Scan

Discover how to build more engagement. As a leader. As a team.

Karen De Boeck
& Jurgen Maus

Do you recognise this?

Teams expects from their leaders, scrum masters, coaches or managers to act in an engaging way, to be inspiring, a role model.

Leaders expect from their teams to be self-organising, continuous improving, have fun in their work. To be engaged.

Join our session and experience what is the subtle difference, that makes a team:

– complain at the coffee machine, or warmly welcome the idea

– swipe something to the bottom of the backlog, or start a creative discussion on how to make things happen.

Be prepared for a confronting and insightful experience! And leave the session with 5 concrete tips to build on engagement.

Goal of the session: Discover a hands-on scan to make the impact of management interventions on the engagement of the team transparent and trigger the conversation to improve on it. As a leader. As a team.
Intended audience: jan, marieke, leo, bram, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: None
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning session

The engagement scan is a hands-on, immediately applicable tool for leaders, teams, and coaches.

We challenge management to look through the eyes of employees before executing interventions to make them more effective. Your take away is how you can easily do it yourself.

Interactively, step by step, we build up and you apply the scan on your own case. Litterally by walking through the scan on the workshop floor.

You reflect on your own behaviour and your teams. And leave the room inspired, with a scan in your backpack, and actions eager to undertake.

We briefly explain the underlying Job Demands-Resources model of Bakker and Demerouti, resulting from scientific research on burnouts.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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24

Agility in the building sector – is that possible?

Tailoring the agile bricks

Satu Panzner
& Philipp.Diebold@bagilstein.de

The building sector could be more agile – if it was not so hard to cope with all the bureaucracy. So, when it comes to the bureaucracy, there might be reasons like security etc. to have these limits – but getting things done better, faster, smoother is what is aimed for.

Agility and security plus time to market can well work together. We need to find the RIGHT agility for the stakeholders involved.

With Lego Serious Play I would like to find out how to best improve our idea in order to make it great idea.

Session will be intense but fun – and I hope to get loads of new learnings and ideas from this session via your input, ideas and the exchange in the reflection 🙂

Goal of the session: Participation, let the creativity beast out, use hand-brain-coordination, let's build and discuss, after the creative phase – let's learn together from each other – let's make the building and authorities sector a more user friendly stakeholder with a unique UX.
Intended audience: people who are building, intend to build or have been building a house, garage, shop, etc., people from the authories, people from the building sector would be great
Expected experience: open for new things, open to learn, open to experience and discuss, share and reflect
Session Type: 150 min experiential learning session


We are checking out whether it is possible to make the construction industry (especially neighbourhood management), which is crippled by bureaucracy, a little more supple through agile building blocks.

Wouldn't it be cool if you could have an eloquent and user-friendly experience in future building projects (whether your own little house, a block of flats or even an entire neighbourhood) and realise your building project in an agile way together with everyone involved?

We are still at the beginning – but we have the dream that the building industry could also benefit from just the right agility that suits them. We are still mixing the imaginary cement, measuring with folding rule and spirit level, checking with the foreman….

We want to make the construction industry agile – are you ready to start building it with us?

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30

Debriefing! This is the way

Get better at debriefing serious games with the Debriefing Cube

Cédric Pontet

Debriefing is the most important part of a game. The Debriefing Cube is a tool that allows you to get better at debriefing the games and activities you facilitate.

Goal of the session: A the end of this session, you will have played a game, and debriefed it using the Debriefing Cube. Therefore, you will have understood the power of debriefing using the Cube.
Session Type: 60 min discovery session

Nothing makes me sadder than a great game without proper debriefing. A game is only a metaphor for learning. And if you want your audience to remember what they learn, experimenting with the game is not enough. You, as a facilitator, need to give the audience some space to reflect on that experience and anchor knowledge acquisition. This activity is called debriefing, and this is what the Debriefing Cube has been designed for.

Too often, debriefing is either not done at all, or the debriefing questions are something like How was it?, Was it fun?, or even worse, the facilitator explains what people should have understood. Let's change that.

The Debriefing Cube has been invented and refined at #play14 by Chris Caswell and Julian Kea. It is licensed as Creative Commons, and I have made it my personal mission to spread the greatness of this tool.

In this session, we will play a simple game in small groups. Then, each group will use the Debriefing Cube to debrief their own experience and foster their own learning experience. We will finish by sharing our thoughts about the tool with the whole audience.

Join me to discover the many ways the Debriefing Cube can be used, to debrief games or any type of workshop, activity or training.

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50

Let the drawing beast out!

how drawn images boost your meeting

Dimitri Bauwens

Have you seen your peers doze off after one too many? Powerpoint slides that is!

Have you gotten in another endless discussion where people keep thinking that more words will clear out the problem?

It turns out that the phrase "a picture says more than a thousand words" also holds true in meetings, in collaboration sessions, or anywhere else on the workfloor.

Let's explore the possibilities you can have with just a few lines and basic forms and see how it can spice up (or clear out) your meeting!

Intended audience: Marieke, Leo, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Hank
Expected experience: beginner
Session Type: 60 min discovery session

In this session we will explore the entertaining trait of drawing lines and how they can produce a very powerful image for people to find a common understanding. When filled with a little speck of color, or a shade, everything becomes more clear.

Finding out what basic shapes we all should have in our toolbelt and how to combine them to bigger images.

After the basic shapes, we try ourselves to re-create a situation and discuss on how we tackled this.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

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20

What's on your team's mind?

Use experential learning to make a team high performant

Eddy Bruin

In this session I offer you a way to let your team experience what Patrick Lencioni meant with the 5 dysfunctions of a team. The session with your team will just take 30 minutes, but it's fun and makes it very clear what you need in order to become high performant!

Goal of the session: have a new fun tool to help your teams how to become high performant
Intended audience: Leo,Bram,Vincent,Ellen
Expected experience: None
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning session

Sure a team needs to work together in order to get good results. But hoe does 'work together' look like? What factors are important? Patrick Lencioni introduced the 5 Dysfunctions of a Team back in the early 2000s. If we just read the book and explain these dysfunctions to the team they will correct them and become high performing, right?

In this session I offer you a game to let your team experience what Patrick Lencioni meant. The game will just last a couple of minutes, but is playable and fun indefinitely! I've used the game many time to let teams feel where they (dys)function and how they can correct it. Meanwhile I introduce them to Patrick lencioni's pyramid making much more impact and willingness to become high performant.

The reason the game works is because it simulates how a team functions. Since the rules of the game are super simple the behavior of the team become very apparent. You can use this game and the lessons from Lencioni to make the team aware of where they can improve in becoming a higher-performing team.

I'll teach you the game, give you facilitation tips and tricks and you can get going the next day!

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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20

The Great Sense of belonging

From great resignation to create sense of belonging

jord@humanfarer.com

To participate in your team engagement, you need to know what drives you. We will use serious games to speak about our personality types and motivations. We will discuss how to feed our community with these drivers of our sense of belonging.

Goal of the session: Learn what are your motivations and how to use it to engage your community.
Intended audience: Marieke, Leo, Bram, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning session
Materials: Moving motivators, MeWe cards personality types, Community canvas

The great resignation is a movement of large resignation of employees in the big IT consulting firms. Working from home only revealed what was already demanded by millennials: a sense of belonging.

In this workshop, we will test our personality type and our motivation to understand what is our drive.

Sources: MeWe cards on ocadee.com, Moving motivators from management30.com, community-canvas.org, noble purpose by Olivier Onghena t'Hooft.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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30

Laptop

Xtrem TDD

Never stop learning

Yoan Thirion
& Guillaume Faas

Goal of the session: Discover dev practices and use what they have learned during the workshop when they go back to their team.
Intended audience: Jan, Bram, Hank
Expected experience: Every developer, with any background, keen to learn in a handful way
Session Type: 90 min hands on coding/design/architecture session

You have probably already heard or practiced Test-Driven Development (TDD) but have you already tried it in an Xtrem way?

What do we mean by Xtrem?

We propose to practice TDD on a kata using mob programming and introducing different constraints that you will pick randomly. We expect you to find smart ways to overcome those constraints.

Those constraints can be of different types : Design, Testing, Practice, Architecture.

Here are some example of constraints that we have documented on our website :

– Use TCR workflow (Test && Commit || Revert)

– Use a Test DataBuilder

– Check your dependency freshness with libyear

– Write only pure functions

– Make at least 2 refactorings after a passing test

– Write your next test using Approval Testing approach

– Check the quality of your tests with Mutation Testing

– and much more …

By overcoming those constraints you will learn new ways of designing your code that you will be able to use in your day-to-day.

#sharingiscaring

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

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max
200

Death to boring meetings

Wise Crowds Liberating Structures Design Session

Jeremy Nathaniel Akers

Give and get help reinventing your worst meetings as we learn and use Liberating Structures

Intended audience: Agile Coaches, Scrum Masters, Designers, Testers, Product People, Team Leads, Project realizers, managerials
Expected experience: None required all the way to over 9000
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning session

Client:

Have you had all you can take of horrible meetings? What’s the one you just can’t stand anymore and would love to reinvent?

Bring your case to the WiseCrowds Liberating Structures Design Session and be our Client. Get considerations, ideas and advice by offering the Consultants a Design Brief:

Place: context your meeting is happening in

Purpose: intended goal/outcome of your session

Participants: who you’ll need in order to be successful

Particulars: online/offline, timebounds and stuff

Consultant:

Are you familiar with hosting interactive meetings and workshops? Looking to flex your muscles and want to cross pollinate with others?

Join the WiseCrowds Liberating Structures Design Session as a Consultant, offering your advice on the Client’s Design Brief.

Learner:

Are you sick and tired of boring, long, soul-crushing meetings? How would you like to get more done in lesss time? Then begin your Liberating Structures Learning Journey! Just watch and we’ll help you discover new tools you can use to live a better life?

Join the WiseCrowds Liberating Structures Design Call and observe how LS can be applied to real life situations.

Read more about the Wise Crowds structure:

https://www.liberatingstructures.com/13-wise-crowds/

https://www.liberatingstructures.com/21-design-storyboards/

https://medium.com/the-liberators/tap-the-wisdom-of-the-whole-group-in-rapid-cycles-with-wise-crowds-18e56f455680

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max
18

Spiral into Teamwork

Improve Collaboration by Understanding Each Others Needs

Remi-Armand Collaris

Did you ever wonder why some communities/departments/teams live/work well together while others clash? What patterns govern our growth and development? What needs drive us to act the way we act? And what you can learn from that to improve the collaboration and effectiveness of your teams?

In this session, we are going to create a constellation using Spiral Dynamics to better understand the ingredients for team and individual growth and wellbeing.

Goal of the session: You will be able to improve teamwork by using animals as a metaphor for individual and group needs and team dynamics
Intended audience: Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Ellen
Expected experience: Some experience with team development and personality styles
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning session
Materials: Download materials for a constellation using Spiral Dynamics (comming soon)

Did you ever wonder why some communities/departments/teams live/work well together while others clash? What patterns govern our growth and development? What needs drive us to act the way we act? And what you can learn from that to improve the collaboration and effectiveness of your teams?

In this session, we are going to create a constellation using Spiral Dynamics to better understand the ingredients for team and individual growth and wellbeing. Starting off with Tuckman's stages of team development and Lencioni's dysfunctions of teamwork, we will create a map of individual and group needs that govern our behavior.

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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Fishbowl discussion about all things agile

Who needs speakers when you have an engaging audience like xpdays benelux

Yves Hanoulle

During this evening session, I'll facilitate a fishbowl discussion with people at the conference.

If my session is accepted, I'll pick a few speakers from the program and I'll invite a few people from the audience and we'll add an extra chair and we will have a (guided) discussion about agile

Everyone in the audience will be free to join the discussion (as I'm using the fishbowl format)

It will be like the best discussions at the bar at the xpday benelux conference, just before the bar closes, yet now we'll start them an hour or so after dinner…

And we keep going till I'm either out of questions, the speakers our out of answers, no one is anymore in the room or some other random reason to stop the session

y

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15

Let's build a mandala

Silence is a bliss

Cédric Pontet

Fun and relaxing activity, that will allow you to connect with the people around you and relax.

Goal of the session: Fun, connection, relaxing
Intended audience: Everyone is welcome
Expected experience: No previous experience needed
Session Type: 60 min discovery session

Have you ever seen a mandala? Yes, this giant geometric shape, formed with colorful sand by Buddhist monks.

In this session, we will build our own mandala, using only what we find around us. We will do it collaboratively, in complete silence, without judgment.

At the end of it, everyone will be super zen, and proud of our achievement.

We will of course spend some time discussing how such an activity can be brought to a working environment, and share ideas.

Curious? Here is what a Mandala looks like. It was built outside during ISC19FR.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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Presenters

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

Website: http://www.ilean.be

I work as a Scrum Master, Agile Coach, facilitator, and educator.

I work at iLean: http://www.ilean.be.

If you want to know more about my background, studies, certifications, experiences, interests … connect with me on http://linkedin.com/in/frederikvannieuwenhuyse/ and my professional activities, check https://value-first.be/.

Happy to listen to you and reflect! How can I help you today?

Frederik is also XP Days Benelux co-organizer, Agile Consortium Belgium board member, and event organizer at the Agile Belgium meetup.



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Philippe Vandessel

Philippe Vandessel

Website: http://www.ilean.be

In 2015 I participated in a Scrum team. This way of working was such a revelation and in the same time also a coming home. Finally all the pieces of the puzzle fell together. From that point on scrum and anything agile was the only way forward for me.

Since that time, I have helped several teams in adopting agility step by step by facilitating a culture founded on collaboration, trust and continuous improvement.



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Philippe Bourgau

Philippe Bourgau

Website: https://philippe.bourgau.net

Twitter: @pbourgau

eXtreme Programming coach and sustainable pace Hacktivist!

Life is too short for boring stuff! So I help software engineers to reach a productive and sustainable pace through continuous refactoring of their code and organization.



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Ahmad Atwi

Ahmad Atwi

Website: https://ahmadatwi.me/

Twitter: @ahmadatwi



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Christophe Vantighem

Christophe Vantighem

Website: https://www.agilevalue.com

Hi, I am Christophe, Agile Coach at Deutsche Bahn in Frankfurt. I grew up in north of France at the belgian border and moved to Germany 18 years ago.

I have discovered agility in 2011 when I was manager of software development teams.

Since then I could'nt get it out of my head, trying to be a little bit more agile every day, at work or in my personal life.

Besides my job at DB, I have cofounded AgileValue, which is providing software to help organizations on their agile journey.

When I am not working, I like to be on a road bike, to paint, or to play board games with my two boys.



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Sylvain CHERY

Sylvain CHERY

Website: http://www.agilepartner.net

Twitter: @sylchery

I co-founded Agile Partner in Luxembourg in 2004 and within 18 years we have built the local leader in Agile Management, including Scrum and Kanban, and software development with a team of 50+ people. We help organizations of all kinds transform for more efficiency, innovation and happiness at work. We do this by developing great software products and by helping our customers evolve into more agile organizations.

I am an entrepreneur, passionate about making things happen. Over the years I grew from analyst to Agile Coach, with enthusiasm about technology and profound respect for people. Very early I started bridging my main areas of interest, which are Agile management, entrepreneurship and sustainable development, by learning and experimenting Lean Startup, Design Thinking, Management 3.0…

My specialties are: leadership and management, entrepreneurship, innovation, CSR, Sustainable IT, change management, team work and collaboration, Lean Agile product development, Scrum, Kanban, requirements analysis, business development and marketing.



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Robert van Lieshout

Robert van Lieshout

Website: https://www.pragmaticall.nl

Robert is a compassionate agilist, coach and facilitator, with a love for happy people and high standards. He combines excellent theoretical knowledge with a pragmatic approach and deep respect for the people he works with. He has trained hundreds of people in Scrum and related practices.

A good way to get Robert started is to offer him a beer or a board game.



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Edwin Hanegraaf

Edwin Hanegraaf

Website: http://www.effectivecoaching4u.nl

I am an Agile (Team) Coach for multiple Teams, enabling happy teams and happy customers. The agile and scrum values and strive for real autonomy, mastery and purpose are crucial to achieve these goals. I collaborate enthusiastically the whole company in their agile journey, starting from defining where we stand until enabling the next (small) steps to take. My main focus lies within the most complex part of the equation, the human being and its behavior, and most of my experience lies within the Industry & Technology type of companies, where hardware and software come together.



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Mohamed Gargouri

Mohamed Gargouri

I'm passionate about Scrum. I love it's simplicity to deal with complexity and uncertainty.

I help individuals, teams and organisations increasing their ability to adapt and succeed within our VUCA world.

Being a Scrum Master on the field, having worked with Scrum Teams in different contexts, help me to shape a good balance between serving and leading, facilitating and teaching, coaching and mentoring. Still, “agility” is an ever ending learning journey!

Being part of the Professional Scrum Trainers community allows me contributing to scrum.org’s mission: “Helping People and Teams Solve Complex Problems”.



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Samuel Leroy

Samuel Leroy

Scrum master for 5 years, currently working at Pictet Technologies Luxembourg.



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Vera Peeters

Since 2019, I teach programming courses at Thomas More for the students "graduaat programmeren".

We focus on creating stuff instead of studying theory. We try to infiltrate the students with an agile mindset.

In a previous life I have been developer, release coördinator, agile coach, agile consultant, co-organizer of conferences like XPDays Benelux, XP200x, Javapolis (currently known as Devoxx).



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Chris Verlnden

Website: http://www.adjugo.com



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Patrick Duisters

Patrick Duisters

Website: https://improveqs.nl/

With a business engineering view I have been involved in IT development and quality assurance for 25 years. I have always been interested in the quality aspects of IT, and therefor involved in setting up, supporting and improving of software development processes, mostly originated from my testing background.

Over the years I, of course, embraced agile practices. Within Improve Quality Services, I am participating in several agile expertise groups, of which 'agile and compliance' is one of them. Here I combine my experience of working in agile environments and regulated environments, like the medical and automotive domain.

For many years I’ve internationally active as test architect, trainer/teacher, consultant, and improver in various industries. I hold a range of certificates and I am an accredited trainer for various testing courses from Foundation to Expert level.

I am a (co-)author of presentations and articles and blogs about requirements engineering, usability, testing, and agile in regulated industries. Speaker at conferences such as EuroSTAR (Stockholm), Romanian Testing Conference (Cluj-Napoca), Netherlands Testing Conference (Eindhoven), and tutoring courses and workshops arround Europe and in Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia).

For more info, visit my LinkedIn profile: www.linkedin.com/in/patrickduisters



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Marco van de Pol

Marco van de Pol

Website: https://improveqs.nl/

As a scrum master/project manager, I have gained a lot of experience and knowledge in the past 15 years in leading innovative projects and managing and working with multifunctional teams.

Building beautiful functionalities together with a team and allowing the team but also the individuals to grow, gives me a good feeling. I believe in the agile way of working.

I am driven, performance-oriented, accurate, proactive, creative, customer-oriented and critical. But also a team player, a coach and a connector. Since september 2021 i'm working for Improve Quality Services as scrummaster. For more info, please check my LinkedIn, https://www.linkedin.com/in/marcovdpol/

In addition to being a scrum master, I am a freelance photographer. Some of my qualities helps me here to find and create the perfect picture. My work can be seen on my website: https://www.marcovandepolfotografie.nl/



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Karen De Boeck

Karen De Boeck

Website: http://www.adjugo.com

My passion? As agile coach I support people, teams and organizations in their collaboration and self-organisation. To better realize their ambitions.

My approach? Down to earth, making fast small steps. Starting where we ar right now, we define a shared goal, and take ownership of each step ahead.

We don't solve all the issues of the past, as that would result in an ideal past. Instead, together we move ahead towards the future we want to create. Step by step, making use of tools, techniques, frameworks, but most of all by coaching based on positive psychology. Solution-oriented, motivating.

If you feel related to the above, or you are curious to further explore on this, I would be pleased to get in touch.

kdeboeck@adjugo.com

https://www.linkedin.com/in/karen-de-boeck-063813/



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Jurgen Maus

I had the luck to start my professional live in a fantastic team. A team full of energy, realizing our projects, looking for the better way and just having fun.

Over the years that feeling disappeared…

I was lucky to get in touch with some fantastic people that just opened my eyes. A moment that changed my life.

I’m passionate to change the world… I want everyone to get the experience to work in a fantastic team. To feel the motivation, to feel the energy, to feel having a purpose. I coach, I teach, I learn and above all I share all the insights I gather that lead to a positive environment.



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Satu Panzner

Satu Panzner

Website: http://www.bagilstein.de

Agile and systemic coach, trailblazer

When it comes to breaking new ground (in the sense of "where no man has gone before"), changing ways of working and approaching things in a new way, that's exactly where Satu comes in. A pragmatic approach, playful development of potentials (Lego® Serious Play®), active listening and understanding the needs of the other person are part of her tools. She opens up access to everyone – especially to technologically affine employees. She brings many years of experience from the global IT corporate environment, but is also a start-up enthusiast. Her special focus is on appreciative interaction at eye level with people and machines of all cultures.

"I can prepare the way for you – but you have to walk it yourself."



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Philipp.Diebold@bagilstein.de



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Cédric Pontet

Cédric Pontet

Website: https://www.agilepartner.net/

Twitter: @cpontet

Cédric is a seasoned software expert and Agile/Lean coach. He started his software engineering career in 2001 and since 2005, has been happily employed at Agile Partner, where he has worked with a large variety of customers both in public and private sectors.

He is now helping teams on matters such as software architecture, cloud computing, Agile, Lean, and DevOps. Defining himself as curious and pragmatic, Cédric is proud to be part of different communities (Agile, Domain-Driven Design, EventStorming, Sketchnoting) and enjoys mixing these influences to bring people together.

Cédric is a speaker at conferences such as Build Stuff, Voxxed Days, KanDDDinsky, Agile Grenoble and FlowCon. He is also the co-founder of #play14, a worldwide gathering of like-minded people who believe that play is the best way to learn, share and be creative.



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Dimitri Bauwens

Dimitri Bauwens

Website: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dimitri-bauwens/

Twitter: @dimitribauwens

For nearly a decade in the world of Scrum and agility. First as a developer, then as a Scrummaster/Team Coach

I help teams and individuals gain more agility. Not through rigorous processes, but by learning what works for individuals and teams.

Experienced in (graphic) facilitation, Scrum, Kanban, Liberating structures, impact mapping, storymapping, gamestorming and many more!

Love to learn more about graphic facilitation, people, how to achieve flow.



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Eddy Bruin

Eddy Bruin

Website: Https://www.theseriousgamers.com

Twitter: @eddybruin

For many years Eddy & Jordann have been using serious games and learning metaphors in their coaching. They have facilitated and created games that advocate agile to move teams forward.



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jord@humanfarer.com



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Yoan Thirion

Yoan Thirion

Website: https://yoan-thirion.gitbook.io/knowledge-base/

Twitter: @yot88

I am passionate about agility and liberated organizations.

I became addicted to agility from my first reading of the manifesto and am firmly convinced that the only way to work is by considering people as individuals in their own right and no longer as "resources".

My personal aspiration is to help as many teams as possible to deliver in the best possible conditions by helping them develop their capabilities.



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Guillaume Faas

Guillaume Faas

Website: https://github.com/Tr00d

Building software has always been a passion of mine. This is still true after 10 years of experience in various environments and business sectors. I've never really considered it work but "problems to solve". Yes, I do love puzzles or anything that requires you to turn your head around ^^

Passion also means curiosity and hunger for knowledge. I regularly read blogs, articles and books. Some of my favourites authors are Mr. Martin and Mr. Seemann.

If I had to pick one priority when building a product, I would choose quality. This has always been what I put first. I'm not satisfied when "It Works", it must also be done well.

Wherever I've been, I always tried to improve the team I joined. Whether by providing experience, a fresh eye, ideas or mentoring younger peers.

Talking about mentoring, sharing knowledge represents a key aspect of my participation in a team. I do believe that knowledge is useless if you keep it to yourself. We need to use our knowledge to teach and inspire others, the same way others have inspired us.

Feel free to take a look at my GitHub account : https://github.com/Tr00d

You'll find katas I do for fun or coaching purposes but mostly, you'll see the way I code.



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Jeremy Nathaniel Akers

Jeremy Nathaniel Akers

Website: https://www.meetup.com/changehackers/

Twitter: @gospelofchange

Jeremy is a human being! Known for his disruptive presence and enthusiasm, he shows up on film. Currently he is most active building a bridge between Liberating Structures and web3. A Regen obsessed with building trust and upgrading coordination, he is developing proof-of-learning, DAOing and hanging out. You can find him doing the Accenture Business Agility thing, learning at the Token Engineering Commons, hanging out in the Liminal DAO or hosting the Think Slow Dojo and Wise Crowds LS Design Call.

When asked “where do you find the energy to do all this stuff?”

He says “I just imagine myself inhabiting the future the I most want to be a part of and download the excitement of that potential experience into the present!”



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Remi-Armand Collaris

Remi-Armand Collaris

Website: https://connectivepartners.pro

Twitter: @racollaris

I believe an organization's success is closely linked to the space employees experience to develop their talents and to make a real collaborative difference. Using Agile, Scrum and Lean thinking, I develop tools to improve collaboration.

My experience is that it takes just a few days a month for a team to take ownership of their way of working and improving it as part of their work. This makes for more fun and drive in the workplace (and more astonishing result as a by-product).



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Yves Hanoulle

Website: http://www.hanoulle.be

Twitter: @YvesHanoulle



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Participants

Jan
Jan

Jan has been working as a programmer for 5 years now. Jan loves to program. He knows a lot of languages, and a lot of tools. At work, he he is not always happy because the circumstances often force him to deliver the quality he knows he can reach. Jan explores new technologies and trends on the internet and in books and magazines. At night Jan contributes to an open source project together with 10 other guys, from all over the world. That's where he heard about agile methodologies. In the open source group, he is used to work with unit tests, but he hopes to get some real in-depth tips and tricks from experts at the XP Days conference. He is also interested to learn about the latest trends for continuous intergration tools and test automation.

Meet Jan at the following sessions

Marieke
Marieke

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis. Several months ago, her team had an introductory training on extreme programming and scrum. Some of the ideas she learned about seemed interesting enough, but she is not sure if this methodology is applicable in their particular situation. After the course, some of her colleagues started to write unit tests, but there still are only a few, and they are not run very often, as far as Marieke can see. They also started to do a daily standup meeting, because according to the trainers that is a tool to enhance communication within the team. But these meetings are rather boring, and they tend to take 1/2 hour, every day. Team members are grumbling about wasting their time.

Marieke started to think all this agile stuff is only an unusable hype. But then she heard about XP Days, and she thought "well, let's give it another chance, if 150 people go to this conference, for 11 years in a row now, maybe there is more to it". She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have applied these techniques, which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.

Meet Marieke at the following sessions

Leo
Leo

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. Over the years, Leo has been working as a developer, as a project lead, as a tester, as an analyst, as a manager, and as a consultant. He knows from experience that everything comes back, if you only wait a few years. He has learned that the same problems and the same solutions have been invented and re-invented a hundred times in computer science. He has lived through the rise and fall of uncountable new technologies and methodogies. All of them brand new, all of them the one and only forever best way to make software. Leo wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.

Meet Leo at the following sessions

Bram
Bram

Bram has never missed an XP Days. He has been to several other conferences in Europe, and also attended quite a few bigger agile and other conferences. Bram likes the XP Days, because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.

Meet Bram at the following sessions

Philippe
Philippe

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He has never heard about this agile stuff. He doesn't know what it is, or what it can be used for. He guesses it is something his boss wants to buy. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.

mmm I think maybe it is not very useful for Philippe to come to the XP Days? -Vera

Why not? Let Philippe come, let him relax and have a beer and dinner with agile people. He might even attend some presentations. And, once he's relaxed, who knows what could happen? –Pascal

Meet Philippe at the following sessions

Georges
Georges

Georges is a project manager. His life is filled with stress, deadlines, difficult programmers, unhappy customers and demanding bosses. Sometimes he wonders if he's chosen the right career.

Lately, Georges has been hearing more and more about agile methods. Some of his ex-colleagues have converted from project management to agile coaching. They tell him tales of vibrant, exciting, fun projects where customers and developers live in perfect harmony. That can't be true. They must be exaggerating. Or are they….?

Meet Georges at the following sessions

Vincent
Vincent

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. His teams don't do too badly. Some projects are allright; some don't fully satisfy their users. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. So, Vincent looks around for solutions that might help him to create and implement the plan. He has looked at a lot of things: processes, tools, consultants… He's heard that some other companies (even some reputable companies) have had success with "agile" methods, so he comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him. He doesn't know what to expect. Hippy surfer dudes? 18 year old wizz kids with piercings? Greybearded hackers? Oh well… What does he have to lose?

Meet Vincent at the following sessions

Joke
Joke

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke understands her customers needs, she has lots of ideas for new features that would enhance the product. She knows that this product really enhances its user's lives. That's one of the reasons her company is so succesful. But they have trouble keeping up with customer demand. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. If only she and the development team could work together more efficiently, they could make this product make more of a difference. Maybe this "agile" stuff can help? How does product management work in agile projects? Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.

Meet Joke at the following sessions

Hank
Hank

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. Appalled and bemused by the shocking waste of time, money, and people, he does his best to bring the joy back in the life of those around him by introducing agile methodologies wherever he sees the opportunity. Hank comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.

Meet Hank at the following sessions

Ellen
Ellen

Ellen is an agile coach. She's been using agile methods for a few years now. XP, SCRUM, Lean… it doesn't matter much to her. She's more interested in doing things that matter to deliver value for her customers. She wants to work with a happy team, doing meaningful work.

Ellen wants to learn new ideas and share experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.

Meet Ellen at the following sessions